Marlene Wagman-Geller

"As far back as I can remember, it was always on my bucket list, even before the term bucket list was coined,
to be a writer. It was a natural progression to want to go from reading books to writing one."
blogpage

It Took a Yankee (1926)

It Took a Yankee (1926)
Aug 06, 2022 by Marlene Wagman-Geller
    Urban legend has it that the word golf is an acronym for gentlemen only ladies forbidden. Although the etymology is incorrect, what is true is that women and sports have often seemed incompatible. If a lady attempted to sneak in during the ancient Olympic Games, the men would throw her off Mount Typaeon. Fortunately, Gertrude Ederle merited a kinder fate, and she became the first woman to conquer the English Channel.

Bon Appetite (1924)

Bon Appetite (1924)
Aug 04, 2022 by Marlene Wagman-Geller
The word celebrity used to belong to the provenance of famous musicians, actors, and athletes. It later embraced celebrity chefs: the gourmets who produce Pavlovian responses in dedicated foodies. However, what has been regulated to the shadows is the female Francophile responsible for taking cooks out of the closet and into the mainstream.

Just a Kiss (1968)

Just a Kiss (1968)
Jul 31, 2022 by Marlene Wagman-Geller
A half century ago, when the United States was embroiled in race riots triggered by the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., an era that had experienced the illegality of black and white marriage, Nichelle Nichols became the first black woman to embrace a white man on American television. It was the kiss heard around the galaxy.

England's Rose (1961)

England's Rose (1961)
Jul 29, 2022 by Marlene Wagman-Geller

  

      The British national anthem ends with the words, “Long to reign over us/God save the Queen.” A princess never had the opportunity to sit on the throne, and yet forever rules as an immortal icon. 

In My End (1542)

In My End (1542)
Jul 20, 2022 by Marlene Wagman-Geller
“Cat fight,” a sexist term-without a male equivalent, implies women’s interactions involve the sharpening of nails, a fact some males find titillating. A high-profile female-against-female feud involved two British duchesses and engendered endless speculation as to who made who cry. Their alleged spat would pale in comparison to the tensions between two Renaissance frenemies over the rule of a royal roost.

Fortune's Fool! (1537)

Fortune's Fool! (1537)
Jul 19, 2022 by Marlene Wagman-Geller
       In 2022, Queen Elizabeth II will become the first British monarch to mark seventy years on the throne, an event that will be commemorated with a Platinum Jubilee.  In contrast, a crowned head ruled for even less time than Anne Boleyn, the Queen of one thousand days.

Yours, yours

Yours, yours
Jul 15, 2022 by Marlene Wagman-Geller

         Upon occasion, an individual is the possessor of an extraordinary life résumé, the case with the woman who traversed the road from princess to empress to saint. Her story wove a tapestry that bound the threads of majesty, mayhem, and massacre. 

A Far Better Rest (1775)

A Far Better Rest (1775)
Jul 14, 2022 by Marlene Wagman-Geller

Those who wear the tiara capture the popular imagination, as queens exist in an emerald city of gowns, palaces, and jewels, oh my! And when a royal alters the course of world history, the dust never settles on their stories.

That's All That I Remember" (2013)

That's All That I Remember" (2013)
Jul 13, 2022 by Marlene Wagman-Geller

      A proverb states, “Mighty oaks from little acorns grow,” and this was the case with a hash- tag heard round the world. Its seed was planted on a fateful Florida night when an encounter led to the convergence of the Titanic and the iceberg.

Quite Contrary (1865)

Quite Contrary (1865)
Jul 11, 2022 by Marlene Wagman-Geller

In the film Forrest Gump, Lieutenant Dan snarls at Forrest saying, “They gave you, an imbecile and a moron, the Congressional Medal of Honor.” While President Johnson conferred the award for Gump’s valor in Vietnam, an earlier President Johnson conferred the award for a lady’s valor in the Civil War. Dr. Mary Edward Walker was the first and the only woman to have received the Medal of Honor.   

We Are the Champions (1985)

We Are the Champions (1985)
Jul 07, 2022 by Marlene Wagman-Geller
The woman with pink pixie hair lazed like a fiery comet over the sporting world skies leaving a trail of controversy in her wake. Her story began in Redding, a small, conservative, working-class city in Northern California. Her father, Jim, worked in the day as a construction contractor while her mother, Denise, worked nights as a waitress at Jack’s Grill. The household included seven children, including the three they had together: son, Brian, and twins, Megan and Rachael. Brian, five years older than his sisters, set up cones on the lawn to teach them how to dribble, thereby sowing the seed to fame. As female athletes were invisible at this time, the posters in Megan’s room were all of Michael Jordan. A dedicated Denise drove her daughters two and a half hours each way for practice in Sacramento.  

A Good Judge (1981)

A Good Judge (1981)
Jul 07, 2022 by Marlene Wagman-Geller

    Before the first female presidential nominee of a major political party was a twinkle in the nation’s eyes, before there was a female speaker of the House of Representatives, a female attorney general, or a female secretary of state, there was the F.W.O.T.S.C. – the first woman on the Supreme Court-an acronym Sandra Day O’Connor used when she ascended America’s loftiest bench.

Heartbreak Hotel (1939)

Heartbreak Hotel (1939)
Jul 05, 2022 by Marlene Wagman-Geller

   Scarlett O’Hara loved her home, Tara, as Elvis Presley did Graceland. While Scarlett’s father named his plantation after the Hill of Tara, once the capital of the High King of Ireland, Elvis’ estate received its name from Grace Toof.

Gonna Fly Now (1976)

Gonna Fly Now (1976)
Jul 02, 2022 by Marlene Wagman-Geller

     Simon and Garfunkel sang of a boxer who “carries the reminders of every glove that laid him down.” The lyric describes Rocky Balboa and the real-life Rocky: Chuck Wepner.

Extinct and Forgotten (1846)

Extinct and Forgotten (1846)
Jun 27, 2022 by Marlene Wagman-Geller

     The Smithsonian is America’s greatest treasure chest, filled with 150 million precious artifacts. Surprisingly, the scientist who willed the museum into existence, James Lewis Smithson, never set foot in the United States. 

Ride Sally Ride (1983)

Ride Sally Ride (1983)
Jun 18, 2022 by Marlene Wagman-Geller

    The monologue that introduced the television series Star Trek, “Space: the final frontier. To boldly go where no man has gone before echoes the fascination man has always had with the heavens.”  The men who heeded the siren call of the skies are legendary: Shepard, Glenn, Armstrong, Aldrin. Then came Sally Ride who blazed a cosmic trail when she became the first woman astronaut and shattered the glass dome of the galaxy.

No Humbugging (1849)

No Humbugging (1849)
Apr 21, 2022 by Marlene Wagman-Geller

   A lyric from a 1967 song by Arlo Guthrie is, “You can get anything you want at Alice’s restaurant.” Another place to satiate your heart’s desire is at Harrods, the world’s most famous department store. The emporium’s Latin motto is “Omnia, Omnibus, Ubique.” “Everything for Everybody, Everywhere.” For the green wrapped goody-bags we can thank its founder: Charles Henry Harrod.

In My End (1542)

In My End (1542)
Apr 20, 2022 by Marlene Wagman-Geller
“Cat fight,” a sexist term-without a male equivalent, implies women’s interactions involve the sharpening of nails, a fact some males find titillating. A high-profile female-against-female feud involved two British duchesses and engendered endless speculation as to who made who cry. Their alleged spat would pale in comparison to the tensions between two Renaissance frenemies over the rule of a royal roost.

Till I Die (1847)

Till I Die (1847)
Apr 19, 2022 by Marlene Wagman-Geller

      John Muir, the naturalist who was most at home sleeping outdoors on a bed of pine needles, called the sequoias the “noblest of God’s trees.” The wooden sentries were in their infancy when the Coliseum hosted its gladiator games; their tallest branches would dwarf Lady Liberty’s crown. The spiritual groundskeeper of the Sierra Nevada’s sacred forest: Sequoyah.

Ne Cede Malis (1898)

Ne Cede Malis (1898)
Apr 17, 2022 by Marlene Wagman-Geller

     Visitors to the Bronx anticipate Yankee Stadium, -nicknamed the Bronx Bombers- the zoo, and botanical gardens. The invisible tour guide on these expeditions: Jonas Bronck.